15 posts Page 2 of 2
Hi Rose

Thank you. She was 83 when she was tested in November and has been taking 6000 since. She will be tested again in February and I will really try to convince her to keep her levels up.

Whenever the ms nurse asks we get a tut tut and that she should only be taking 2000 which surprised me. I'd have thought they would have at least said 4000.
Yes they don't seem to agree but we know better!
Remember specialists are owned by drug companies. It's all money driven.
They don't support professor Jelinek' s program because there is no money in it for them.
Rose xx
Hello

With regards to Vit D, its importance in tackling MS is something that is only just being recognised by mainstream medicine (here in the UK in any case).

However, the UK doctors will have to follow certain guidelines as to what is deemed 'safe'. When I was first tested for Vit D, I was at 23nmol/L, which was below low, even by 'normal' medicine standards. My GP gave me a mega dose which boosted my levels.

My understanding of Vit D (certainly in people with MS) is that the body does not store it, which is why we need to constantly keep topped up, particularly here in the UK with our lack of sun.

I recently had to go into hospital and whilst there, the doctors tested my Vit D. I was at 140nmol/L which they deemed to be 'high'. As we know, Prof J suggests higher.

Bear in mind that I live in the UK (had the test in winter) and have an office job - my level was 'only' 140 and I supplement 10,000 iu of Vit D most days.

It is possible to buy home test kits online (monitored by a Birmingham hospital I think), and Vit D in higher doses is also available online, so this is something you can monitor yourself, without the need for GP intervention.

Rachel
Rose wrote: Yes they don't seem to agree but we know better!
Remember specialists are owned by drug companies. It's all money driven.
They don't support professor Jelinek' s program because there is no money in it for them.
Rose xx


In fairness they have their place but diet and reducing stress is the key.
I understand that the O.M.S program states "whatever it takes" and for those that find that taking drugs is helpful to achieve stability then that is so wonderful for them, but I am sorry I do not feel any Specialist I have seen has assisted in my road to recovery in any way accept to suggest drugs. Specialists are owned by drug companies. That's what they study and become trained in.
I don't know where you live, but in New Zealand you do not qualify for drug assistance unless you have a repeat attack in a short period of time. It was 17 years ago , but from memory you had to have had a repeat attack in the space of a year or two. I have remitting relapsing m.s. and did not have an attack for many years later. I understand some people with relapsing remitting do, but fortunately for me I did not.
This was a blessing that i did not qualify for drugs in New Zealand anyway, because I have not needed to take them, thanks to the program.
For 17 years I haven't struck a G.P., nurse,Neurologist or any faculty in the medical department that has supported me in following the O.M.S. program. They have not provided any assistance apart from discussing drugs, which if i wanted to take, I would have to self fund.
It has been a lonely, tough, road to walk until I found the O.M.S. program. The "only place" a Specialist has is to pump drugs, therefore they have "no place" in my life.
I also find diet "key" to recovery along with the other components ie: meditation and exercise.
I find meditation quitens the mind which helps me to just "be in the moment" washing away the stress of the day along with exercise that keeps me mobile. "Never stop moving" is my mantra :-)
Rose
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