14 posts Page 1 of 2
Thank you for this information. I have ank spond markers as well as MS so was interested to read that he treated both diseases with this diet.
It seems similar to dr Wahls diet,.... paleo.

I don't know, some feel better on gluten free it made no difference to me, I just got super skinny. I know someone who has done the "best bet diet" (which cuts out grains, legumes, dairy and all sorts) for years with no success but is now having improvements by getting rid of candida and improving her friendly gut bacteria.

So....... who knows....
hpebbles2 wrote: It seems similar to dr Wahls diet,.... paleo.

I don't know, some feel better on gluten free it made no difference to me, I just got super skinny. I know someone who has done the "best bet diet" (which cuts out grains, legumes, dairy and all sorts) for years with no success but is now having improvements by getting rid of candida and improving her friendly gut bacteria.

So....... who knows....


Yes, it is a sort of paleo diet. Seignalet called it various things, "hypotoxic diet" or "original diet" meaning this was the diet of our "origins" on earth pre pastoralism and agriculture. So it's a similar rationale to the American version of Paleo but with the Seignalet diet each element of the diet is scientifically studied to the nth degree and the diet is aimed at one particular thing, preventing and reversing leaky gut. It's much more than just dairy free and gluten free. Seignalet gives candida as one of the reasons the diet might fail and he advises anyone with candida to read the excellent books that are available on that subject.
The human form original diet was not paleo, that is a convenient step in time of we could so we did, a bit like we can eat macdonalds so we do.
veg wrote: The human form original diet was not paleo, that is a convenient step in time of we could so we did, a bit like we can eat macdonalds so we do.



Sorry. I really do not understand what you are trying to say in your post.
beetroot wrote:
Yes, it is a sort of paleo diet. Seignalet called it various things, "hypotoxic diet" or "original diet" meaning this was the diet of our "origins" on earth pre pastoralism and agriculture.

It is often convenient to say Man's first diet was eating meat because people like to carry on eating meat so it is an easy sell regardless that eating meat makes us sick because we are not designed to eat meat or consume dairy. We learnt to so we did but like eating a mc donalds because we can does not mean we should.
veg wrote:
beetroot wrote:
Yes, it is a sort of paleo diet. Seignalet called it various things, "hypotoxic diet" or "original diet" meaning this was the diet of our "origins" on earth pre pastoralism and agriculture.

It is often convenient to say Man's first diet was eating meat because people like to carry on eating meat so it is an easy sell regardless that eating meat makes us sick because we are not designed to eat meat or consume dairy. We learnt to so we did but like eating a mc donalds because we can does not mean we should.



Oh ok I see. If Seignalet is right it's not so much eating meat which is the problem, it's meat cooked at high temperature.

Also, see Denise Minger's critique of the China Study using Campbell's own data here:

http://rawfoodsos.com/the-china-study/
Sorry - such a sweeping statement as "we are not designed to eat meat" cannot be made truthfully.

Humans are true omnivores, and there has been extensive research carried out into the dietary habits of pre-historic humans, with many and varied findings. However they are all consistent in one key aspect - our very early forebears ate whatever they could get their hands on and mouths around - it was a question of survival for long enough to reproduce and raise their young so that they in turn could reproduce and perpetuate the species. Early humans ate meat - whether opportunistically stumbled upon (i.e. killed by a predator or died of natural causes and not yet gone putrid), or hunted/gathered and whether it be birds, reptiles, insects, or mammalian species. That's why prehistoric cave sites and middens are full of animal bones - the bones were not put there just to confuse our scientists, they are there because they are the leftovers from what was being eaten!

Nearly everything we eat today has been selectively bred by man over thousands of years to become what we call "fruit", "vegetables", "nuts", "grains" etc. None of our present day foodstuffs (apart from meat, fish, and eggs) even remotely resemble their early predecessors. As far as meat goes, it is still basically the same as it was eons ago, it's just that the animals it comes from have changed as man has selectively bred species for certain characteristics and to produce more meat per animal.

There is also no way our very early ancestors would have passed up the chance to raid a bird's nest for eggs - a valuable source of protein and fats for early humans. The grains that are so readily consumed today didn't exist when our very early ancestors were trying to survive - again they are the product of human intervention and development which occurred after humans started to live in small settlements.

Dairy is a slightly different matter - although humans have been consuming dairy products for thousands of years, much of it was from goats or camels and far less from cows (and there is some rather limited but interesting research about consumption of camel's milk having positive effects in auto-immune diseases, Type 1 diabetes, and autism).

There is quite extensive criticism floating around about "Paleo" type diets, including that they are not truly reflective of what our ancient ancestors did eat. The article on this link provides some interesting discussion on "Paleo", and the second link has discussion about foraging theories which would have affected how our ancestors found the food they ate.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/artic ... eally-eat/
http://www.science20.com/the_conversati ... ind-153290

As I have had some of my previous posts misconstrued by some readers, I would like to make it clear that none of the above is intended as criticism of either OMS or any other dietary approach to whatever disease you want to think of. MS is a "modern" disease, as are many others, and there is no doubt that diet is a major contributor, but let's be wary about making sweeping statements which are not accurate in any way.
People love to hear good news about bad habits.
I agree man ate whatever was there to survive.
But we are not just surviving now we want to live a long and active life therefore if we want that we need to do more than just eat what is there because industries provide it. The human body is not designed to consume meat, fact. Long intestines and grinding mouth.
What is a "bad habit" for some people is not necessarily a "bad habit" for others as we are a very diverse species.. One size does not fit all.
(this is a record - the shortest post I've ever done!!! :o )
14 posts Page 1 of 2

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest