14 posts Page 2 of 2
Alex,

thankyou for the great reply & linking me to the Professors post very interesting & yes his last line really does sum it up - well for me anyway
More importantly, people offered this medication should consider carefully whether there is a less risky alternative.


I certainly don't think Tsybari is good step for me with the anxiety have at this point anyway - i actually think my MS nurse was quite suprised that the neurologist had reccomended it as primary treatment aswell.

I have ordered the book you mentioned in several posts THE BRAIN THAT CHANGES ITSELF aside from just looking really interesting reading overall I thought it may also help with my anxiety/stress levels & maybe even something that can assist in returning my right eye back to as it was before optic neuritis. Meditation is certainly something I'm looking at just taking it step by step though - diet, exercise, meditation - the house is a bit busy at the moment but should quieten down in Febuary making the timing to begin meditation more ideal.
Tango,

I did learn a thing or two about anxiety/depresson from the brain book. You might check this one out at the library as well. Don't worry about the depression vs anxiety thing - they are two sides of the same coin and you may be surprised to find some of your internal monologue in this book - lots of us do it.

http://www.amazon.com/Mindful-Way-throu ... 364&sr=1-1

Alex.
Alex

Diagnosis: Jan 2010, OMS April 2010.
Josh,

thanks. It's actually something I go 'round and 'round with, so I appreciate the info. At first, I was very worried, but don't find myself getting ill more than usual. I also asked my Neuro about it and he said that it does lower your white blood cell count, but not enough that your body could not mount a defense against an intruder.

"Avonex can cause a reduction in levels of infection-fighting blood cells, red blood cells, or cells that help to form blood clots. Severe changes of this kind can lessen a person’s ability to fight infections and cause tiredness. Periodic blood tests can identify changes in levels of these important types of cells."

I think the operative word is *can* and in most cases, doesn't. I think that taking meds and being on the program are not mutually exclusive (and neither does the professor). During the first year, I was way too nervous to wait for the diet and I may well have saved myself an exacerbation. I already told my doctor I wanted to see next year's results and start looking at getting off the Meds.

I am beginning to feel that Avonex is not as dangerous as some worry, though certainly if I had a choice between Interferon and Copaxone, it would be an easy choice for Copaxone. However, my insurance doesn't cover it.
Alex

Diagnosis: Jan 2010, OMS April 2010.
Alex,

I was "lucky" enough that my insurance has a $4000/year cap, so with Copaxone running $4011, I easily qualified for their Assist Rx program and get everything completely free. I'm curious, what's your plan as far as coming off of the meds? My gut says I need to go at least 5 yrs. with no disease activity (symptoms or lesions). I was just officially Dx'ed this past November and started Copaxone exactly one month ago today, so I know I still have a long road. I've been following the Recovery plan strictly for the past two weeks, and I absolutely love it.

Josh
14 posts Page 2 of 2

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