6 posts Page 1 of 1
Hi dear OMSers :). I have been on OMS for almost 2 years, no medication, no symptoms, optic neuritis forgotten. I do love food :) and I read a lot of food blogs, e.g http://deliciouslyella.com/ or http://kriscarr.com/.

These girls have been fighting with other issues but they also went vegan - and also gluten free.

This is a big question mark in my head... Do you think it is worh going completely gluten free? I love whole grains etc., but going milk and gluten free is pretty much a tendency today.

What is your opinion / experience?

Thanxxxxx :)
Pretty trendy at the moment to be 'gluten free'. My local supermarket has had a big refit and now devotes a lot of space to expensive, gluten free products - they look pretty unappetising actually. Means they've got less space for some of the products that I do buy - grrrr!

George Jelinek says this in the FAQs - the whole item is well worth reading:
For gluten for example (or tomato for that matter), there are several major problems with the theory. Firstly, there is no clear biochemical similarity between part of the gluten compound and myelin as far as I am aware. Secondly, when we run the epidemiological cross-check, populations that consume wheat do not appear to have a higher incidence than other populations. A further cross-check is to see whether people who do develop auto-immunity to wheat (those with coeliac disease) also get auto-immunity to myelin; the data show that there is not a higher incidence of coeliac disease in those with MS or vice versa. And finally, the animal data don't support a link either.

So I advise people that gluten should be relatively safe. It is important to try to base these recommendations on evidence, not just theory, and I feel comfortable that the evidence does not support a link with gluten sufficiently to make a recommendation to avoid it. Overall, the evidence of any effect of gluten in MS is not convincing enough to warrant changing my own diet to exclude wheat products.

Diet FAQ #17 http://www.overcomingmultiplesclerosis. ... rces/FAQs/

Personally, I don't have any reason to cut out gluten and am doing very well on OMS.
Wendy

Diagnosis Dec 1998 OMS Feb 2010 Retreat Feb 2012
G'day Jude,
Korimako is absolutely right about it being trendy but I'd say unless you experience problems with digestion then I wouldn't bother giving up gluten.

For me gluten in by far the most inconvenient thing I've had to give up but I did it because I am intolerant to wheat, barley, and rye which causes my tummy to bloat and makes me feel uncomfortable half an hour after eating. I'd being living with these consequences all my life but didn't recognise that gluten was the issue until I did a fast.

There is difference between coeliac ( allergic reaction) and gluten intolerant ( sensitivity to gluten) and the blood test seems to only pick up the allergic reaction. To be sure you could try a period of fasting from gluten for a few weeks and then eat a meal to see what effect, if any, it has on you.

I really hope it's nil because of all the extra expense and inconvenience.

For overcoming MS it's far more important to follow the good Prof J's program and keep away from processed food, keep the sat fat level below 20 grams per day (I'm generally about 12 grams but don't count anymore), keep on with daily flaxseed oil, keep your Vit D at 200 nmol level, regular exercise and meditation time.

Wishing a lifetime of good health in the future.
Blessings
Alex

Developed 5 May 2011, Diagnosed 4 Aug 2011, OMS 15 Sept 2011, Gluten-Free 22 February 2012, Recovery declaration 2 September 2014, recanting of recovery declaration due to relapse 14 October 2019.
Dear All, sorry for my late reply, I was just travelling a bit and not near computers. :) Thanks a lot, I also thought not giving up gluten would be completely fine and you supported this idea, so I will not skip grains. :)
Thank you for posting this Jude007. The responses here have got me thinking - about 35 years ago (when I was a child) I had some allergy testing done as I was also highly allergic to bees. One thing the test revealed was an allergy to wheat amongst other things. But we never knew why as I never had any reaction whatsoever to any of my allergens (except bee stings and then it was a race to hospital ) so I continued eating wheat.....now I'm wondering if the allergic reaction was actually how it affects the myelin?
Also it was mentioned above that tomato can be an issue for some people. What kind of reactions are people having from the humble tomato?
Wishing you all well.
KylieD wrote: Thank you for posting this Jude007. The responses here have got me thinking - about 35 years ago (when I was a child) I had some allergy testing done as I was also highly allergic to bees. One thing the test revealed was an allergy to wheat amongst other things. But we never knew why as I never had any reaction whatsoever to any of my allergens (except bee stings and then it was a race to hospital ) so I continued eating wheat.....now I'm wondering if the allergic reaction was actually how it affects the myelin?
Also it was mentioned above that tomato can be an issue for some people. What kind of reactions are people having from the humble tomato?
Wishing you all well.


Just responding to your tomato comment.

Tomatoes give me eczema. ( they are of the nightshade family group of foods)
Not all people react to them, On the Gawler retreat I went on ( OMS retreat) they served us tomatoes so guessing they are ok. ( for some people).
6 posts Page 1 of 1

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests