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I've seen a lot written about tingling during exercise, but i get it during and especially after. I'm not talking about overheating either. It's as if I've "massaged" my spinal lesion.

I did speak wth a Physical Therapist who said to start slower and slower. I'm going pretty slow now.

Has anyone else had this experience? What did you do?
Alex

Diagnosis: Jan 2010, OMS April 2010.
I have always stopped exercising when the tingling started up. As suggested by my first neurologist, I interpret tingling to mean I need more bed rest. You know how it goes. Nothing will help get rid of MS symptoms more effectively than a good MS diet and bed rest, bed rest, bed rest. Also, I think sun bathing helps me heal up from MS problems. I would sit in a nice comfortable chair and rest in the sun for 20 minutes or so each day.
Alex...I think Rebecca's suggestions are good...rest is really critical. I also like to exercise (a lot) and became rather frustrated when I experienced the 'tingling' during or after my training sessions. For me, it was a clear signal I went over my boundary for that day and the tingling usually meant a bit of discomfort unless I rested for a few hours - or in one case a couple of days. I pay attention to my body's signals more now and ease up on the exercise when I notice the tingling - or just work up to more aggressive fitness much slower than before. For instance, I like to jog and a few months ago I was getting the tingling if I pushed to 30 minutes and often needed a few days to recover. I slowly persisted and built up my stamina with quite a lot of patience and today I can push it to about 45-minutes to one hour - but, as I found out last week - I still need the rest of a couple days after such a run. I've also found mixing exercise works quite well...so, in addition to jogging, I have mixed in swimming, weight training and even just walking. The cross-training seems to help build up my strength...as does a daily stretching ritual. Good luck with your fitness and keep listening to your body...
Diagnosis: Jul 2009
OMS: Jan 2010
Jackman,

You explain this perfectly. It is important to build up slowly when exercising. Overdoing things is a problem but so is doing nothing. So, we need to pay attention to what is our bodies are saying. When the tingling starts up, we need to cut back until the tingling goes away. Also, one is best off starting a conditioning program not by jogging but by walking until one can jog a bit at a moderate pace without triggering MS symptoms.

When I was first diagnosed, I sometimes went six months without exercise regularly because my MS symptoms were serious and rest was more important than exercise.

They key is to do enough exercise that you slowly condition yourself. And that is possible. I now walk briskly five days a week for one-half hour each and then spending an additional half hour running intervals.

Rebecca

P.S. In the USA, most people do not get enough sleep and bed rest! This is a bad, bad habit our mothers told us to break and, my goodness, they were right. You know mothers.
Rebecca Hoover wrote: Jackman,

When I was first diagnosed, I sometimes went six months without exercise regularly because my MS symptoms were serious and rest was more important than exercise.

They key is to do enough exercise that you slowly condition yourself. And that is possible. I now walk briskly five days a week for one-half hour each and then spending an additional half hour running intervals.
.


Rebecca - thanks. I don't even know my whole symptoms yet and work very hard to get enough sleep. I'm walking and maybe I'll start exercising, but I'd like things to stabilize or at least get to know my MS.

Can you give any advice on that? Thanks.
Alex

Diagnosis: Jan 2010, OMS April 2010.
dear alex, rebecca and jackmcn...

thank you so much for sharing these insightful questions and answers. you are teaching me a lot that i feel I could hardly learn elsewhere. After getting my diet and my meditation practice plus mind-body issues more or less on track, exercise has long been the next thing, but I have so far not been able to calibrate things right.

I am not able to run properly yet, and sometimes when I have tried, I have pushed it. I also sometimes push it while walking - going too far so symptoms get worse.... (drop foot, coordination problems, fatigue, etc)

What I learn here seems to be to NOT try so hard, too rein in my will power, and instead listen more deeply and take rest whenever required...

I also understand that where I am now, it is best to continue walking, but take it very easy, and instead add more of stuff such as swimming, pilates and qigong... all the while listening deeply and making sure to get the right amount of rest...

Any further ideas, anyone?

all the best, and keep well

bjørn
Bjorn,

It was nice to read your follow-up message...Sounds like you are on the right path to taking control of your situation. I think it is really necessary to have a lot of patience and persistence with your exercise program - I struggle with the former, but I am persistent! I really enjoyed jogging up until last summer when I had my initial (and only) relapse...I couldn't wait to get back to running and was thrilled when I went for my first jog last December. Since then, I have had ups and downs with respect to jogging. Even though I have been able to make it one hour, there are still days I can barely go 30 minutes without feeling the tingling in my spine - a sure sign I need to stop. I have been able to overcome my exercise frustrations by incorporating new and challenging exercises into my week (swimming, biking and weight lifting). I think this broad approach is very helpful in the long run, and for me, weight lifting has been especially helpful in building strength in my legs. Another thing I do is daily stretching exercises (similar to yoga) during the evening for about 45 minutes. This routine has yielded the best results for me to date. I initially had quite a lot of problems with tingling in my legs, cramps and a weak right foot which simply felt colder and less coordinated than my left foot. After 3 months of persistent effort, I can my legs feel 100 % normal...a huge victory which only encourages me to continue exercising. I know everyone is different and responds differently to various treatments and exercises, so you may just need to find that right one that works for you and remain persistent...and patient. Your efforts will yield results!

If interested...here is what I do every evening...

I walk in a figure-eight pattern 15 times...This is a small pattern of about 1.5 meters and is helpful in gauging my balance and coordination. I then spend about twenty minutes with various yoga exercises to help my legs, arms and back. Next, I stand on one leg and lift the other leg up placing the foot into my inner thigh and then raise my hands over my head. I hold this pose for about 30 seconds, then do the same with the other leg. I then do about 25-30 squats, simply standing and squatting down to build strength in my thighs and knees. Finally, I work on my ankles and toes...I lay down flat on the floor and raise one leg straight over my head, trying to go as far as possible. I stretch my hamstrings and work my ankles by bending my toes down toward my head while keeping my legs straight. I do this 30 times (although when I started I only did 10 times). After this exercise I bend the same leg at the knee so the lower part of my leg is perpendicular to the floor. I then simply bend my toes 40 times, followed my bending my foot down so my ankle gets worked...I do this also 40 times, then switch legs and do the same routine with the next leg. Finally, I work my ankles more by extending one leg again like before...straight over my head. I rotate my ankle 25 times in one direction, then reverse the direction and do this 25 more times...I then bend my leg at the knee again, and repeat the rotation exercises in both directions...then finally extend my leg straight out, but slightly elevated from the floor and do the rotations again. I repeat this final process completely with the other leg. When I first started, my rotation were 10x but I felt some immediate results...

Hope all this can help you (or anyone else who is reading this)...and keep up the work you are doing...

Jack
Diagnosis: Jul 2009
OMS: Jan 2010
Thanks for the excellent detail. I will take what I can from it.

As an update on my situation, I have started back slowly. And when I say slowly, it's more slowly than I thought slowly meant.

    I continued to walk to and from work, even though it feels exactly like walking through a foot of snow used to
    When I get out of the bus station, I do not use the escelators - I walk up each and every day
    I walk the stairs at work when I am not too stiff
    I go for walks on weekends
and

yesterday, I did 20 mins on a bicycle machine. I wanted to cry for 2 reasons - 1, I was so happy to be back in the gym and 2 - I was so sad that this 100 Kcals would have been 10 mins of my previous workout. Everyone else at the gym was only worried about getting home on time, not smelling too bad, etc. I was worried about how I would feel the next day, whether i would be able to exercise in the future, etc.

So it was a sad and happy occasion, but I will go back tonight.
Alex

Diagnosis: Jan 2010, OMS April 2010.
Great news Alex...

Keep it up and remember, your patience and persistence will pay off! I remember feeling the same as you when I resumed exercising last December. I used to jog regularly for 45-60 minutes without problem...in December, I was completely elated with a very slow 20-minute jog...I too, cried at the conclusion and they were tears of joy. It was really the first hint I had which indicated I was improving! Today, I don't jog as much as before, but I have no problem to jog 30-40 minutes (also in the heat), swim 500 meters, bike for an hour, etc... I am now able to exercise every day...and I feel much better physically and mentally. So hang in there...your improvements will also come! It may take a bit of time, but there are plenty of small victories before you which are waiting for your celebration!

All the best,
Jack
Diagnosis: Jul 2009
OMS: Jan 2010
That sounds wonderful and is very encouraging. Thanks!.
Alex

Diagnosis: Jan 2010, OMS April 2010.
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