15 posts Page 2 of 2
Bonzo - Can you tell me what fish oil supplement you were taking? Brand, dosage? I too am on the east coast.

Soton - Regarding your comment about zinc and its relationship to testosterone: Zinc (or perhaps just an overabundance of it?) can stimulate the immune system - precisely what those with MS should avoid.

It is a conundrum, alright.I wonder if Dr. Jelinek can weigh in this issue? He not only created the OMS regimen, but has been following it for 15 years!
Thanks for the reply West62. My comment about zinc was purely based on a couple of articles I read on boosting testosterone. I wasn't aware about it acts as an immune system stimulant. I find myself learning everyday with MS!

I would also appreciate Dr Jelinak's opinion on the flax/low T issue. Might it be a case of taking less flax and increasing other sources of Omega 3?
I searched on pubmed for studies looking at the effects of flax seed oil on testosterone levels in men.

This study found here (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22394170) reviews the literature and provides the results of a RCT that found no association between consumption of alpha-linolenic acid and changes in testosterone in men.

"The intake of the n)3 fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), acid (EPA) anddocosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been related to testosterone levels in epidemi-ological analyses. The aim of this study was to assess whether the n)3 fattyacids affects testosterone levels in post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients,who are at risk of testosterone deficiency. In a double-blind, placebo-controlledtrial of low-dose supplementation of n)3 fatty acids, we included 1850 malepost-MI patients aged 60–80 years who participated in the Alpha Omega Trial.Patients were randomly allocated to margarines that provided 400 mg ⁄ day ofEPA–DHA (n = 453), 2 mg ⁄ day of ALA (n = 467), EPA–DHA plus ALA(n = 458), or placebo (n = 472). Serum testosterone levels were assessed atbaseline and after 41 months using whole day blood samples obtained at thesubjects’ home or at the hospital. Subjects were on average age of 68.4 (SD5.3) years old and had baseline mean serum total testosterone of 14.8 (SD5.6) nmol ⁄ L. The four randomized groups did not differ for baseline character-istics. ALA, EPA–DHA, and EPA–DHA plus ALA supplementation did notaffect serum total testosterone compared to placebo. Moreover, n)3 fatty acidsupplementation did not affect the risk of incident testosterone deficiency(n = 76 with total testosterone <8.0 nmol ⁄ L). We conclude that n)3 fattyacids supplementation did not affect serum total testosterone in men who hadhad a MI."

It might be question of dosage as the study above demonstrates no effect on testosterone with 2 g of alpha-linolenic acid. On a personal note, I should mention that while I follow OMS in terms of sticking to a vegan diet, vitamin D supplementation, regular exercise, and meditation, my general approach to fish oil / flax seed oil is to not to go too far beyond what is generally recommended. However, I do so because I have been treated with alemtuzumab, so I don't really need to maximize whatever positive immune system modulation may be provided by omega-3 supplementation.
I searched on pubmed for studies looking at the effects of flax seed oil on testosterone levels in men.

This study found here ( https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22394170) reviews the literature and provides the results of a RCT that found no association between consumption of alpha-linolenic acid and changes in testosterone in men.

"The intake of the n)3 fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), acid (EPA) anddocosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been related to testosterone levels in epidemi-ological analyses. The aim of this study was to assess whether the n)3 fattyacids affects testosterone levels in post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients,who are at risk of testosterone deficiency. In a double-blind, placebo-controlledtrial of low-dose supplementation of n)3 fatty acids, we included 1850 malepost-MI patients aged 60–80 years who participated in the Alpha Omega Trial.Patients were randomly allocated to margarines that provided 400 mg ⁄ day ofEPA–DHA (n = 453), 2 mg ⁄ day of ALA (n = 467), EPA–DHA plus ALA(n = 458), or placebo (n = 472). Serum testosterone levels were assessed atbaseline and after 41 months using whole day blood samples obtained at thesubjects’ home or at the hospital. Subjects were on average age of 68.4 (SD5.3) years old and had baseline mean serum total testosterone of 14.8 (SD5.6) nmol ⁄ L. The four randomized groups did not differ for baseline character-istics. ALA, EPA–DHA, and EPA–DHA plus ALA supplementation did notaffect serum total testosterone compared to placebo. Moreover, n)3 fatty acidsupplementation did not affect the risk of incident testosterone deficiency(n = 76 with total testosterone <8.0 nmol ⁄ L). We conclude that n)3 fattyacids supplementation did not affect serum total testosterone in men who hadhad a MI."

It might be question of dosage as the study above demonstrates no effect on testosterone with 2 g of alpha-linolenic acid. On a personal note, I should mention that while I follow OMS in terms of sticking to a vegan diet, vitamin D supplementation, regular exercise, and meditation, my general approach to fish oil / flax seed oil is to not to go too far beyond what is recommended as healthy for the general population. However, I do so because I have been treated with alemtuzumab, so I don't really need to maximize whatever positive immune system modulation may be provided by omega-3 supplementation.
Thanks sjodoin, this is really appreciated.

Since my last post I have cut out flax seeds and upped other sources (fish, chia seeds etc). To be honest I haven't noticed a massive change (T level still feels low but haven't been tested since Oct). For me this is a much a 'mind' issue as it is 'body' - I feel like the last ~18 months (relapse, diagnosis, treatment, learning about OMS and how/why to comply with it etc) have been a rollercoaster of emotions and stress and there are bound to have been adverse psychological effects.

My situation is possibly similar to yours - I'm following OMS and also on alemtuzumab (having my second round this week as it happens!). I'm really interested by your comment about not needing to maximise omega 3 benefits. Can you say more about this? I follow the logic here but wanted to know if this is just your personal take and if there's science to back it up/ or whether others agree?

Going back to flax, I'm probably going to start including it again but just in normal doses as I do love the flavour :)

Thanks
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