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In Prof Jelinek's new article under News and Events, he refers to the Mayo Clinic's suggested treatment for mild or infrequent attacks to be careful monitoring rather than medications (http://www.mayoclinic.org/multiple-scle ... tment.html).

This is a tricky subject because the labels "benign" and "mild" are controversial in and of themselves. Some say that mild cases are just those cases where the person with MS was more attuned to their body and so reported smaller symptoms from the outset that others were more prone to ignore.

I think that I fall into the "mild" category if it exists. To be clear, the first thing I experienced was a fingernail size numb patch on one leg that is still there that I was told was simply an innocuous aggravated nerve and nothing to worry about--a neurologist said it would resolve on its own and was surprised that I had even found it. Five months later my toe went numb on the other leg for less than 24 hours and then this was followed by transient residual tingles going on for a few months now.

In this situation it would seem I am a mild case considering these relapses don't even really qualify as textbook attacks. I would never be able to ignore these sensations but I imagine others could fail to see the severity of the situation.

I guess it would be helpful to know more about what constitutes a mild disease course and also why they recommend a different treatment for such cases. Do they believe that it will stay mild? Isn't uncertainty with disease course the reason you treat it as soon as possible? I have incorporated all of the OMS suggestions and am currently not on any meds. I don't want to introduce any toxic meds into my body if I am going to get pregnant (which was the plan in a few months and now of course we have to consider everything anew).

Isn't "mild" a bit subjective and maybe even a misnomer?
I am assuming that with mild cases, the drugs may not be very affective. If you have a mild case with infrequent attacks, then maybe the course of the disease need not be altered by drugs that may be toxic to your system, anddo not work that well in the long run anyhow. That being said, I'm not sure of the time frame to wait to see if you do have indeed a mild case. Is it the first five years, which I have read? I have had mild symptoms for 22 years and have never been on any drugs. This for me is a little scary topic, because I would love to know that my case will stay mild, but I have read that there is no guarantee and that most people who have RRMS do go on to the progressive form. What I would also like to know though, are there cases of mild MS throughout one's lifetime? With the diet in my favor, I am hopefully increasing the odds a great deal that my case will stay mild throughout my lifetime.
This is a critical issue. The unfortunate truth is that there is no such thing as so-called benign MS (see http://www.overcomingmultiplesclerosis. ... benign+MS/). If you do nothing about this illness, then there is almost always insidious progression, with neuronal loss, loss of cognitive function, and so on, at the very least. This program is about preventing that. It is not just the diet, but the sunlight, vitamin D, omega 3s, exercise, stress reduction, etc, that contribute towards stabilising the illness and preventing further damage. After a life lived according to these priniciples, there is every reason to hope for not only mild illness, but with luck, none at all!

Be well

George
I was hoping there was such a thing as mild MS. I was thinking that maybe something was protecting me from getting worse.??? Could there be?? After 22 years I have had very little progression without doing anything about the disease. The only thing I may have done without realizing it was eat a low saturated fat diet. I am very happy and thankful that I have found this website and as soon as I did, I started following the program. With some bumps along the way, (reading lables wrong, thinking peanut butter was ok, finding the right vitamin D and fish oil), I am well on my way to beating this disease!! I know I have to stay positive..it is just hard to come to terms with the fact that there is no such thing as mild MS.
I come back to this post and read the professor's comments when I'm feeling worried. After only 1 year of the disease, I still worry when I read about someone with disability after x years. now I'm doing pretty well, and doing all aspects of the programme and taking my meds, so I have every reason to be hopeful - but still - I do notice it hanging over me sometimes and come back here for comfort.
Alex

Diagnosis: Jan 2010, OMS April 2010.
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