13 posts Page 1 of 2
Hi, apparently I have PPMS. Just found out age 51 and 3/4.

Have been researching what causes MS.
But if any of the reasons given are true (diet/vit D deficiency/bacteria/auto-immune disorder) then why are there not millions of fat, pale, unhealthy people in the western world with MS?
If you get my point? Why only in the thousands???

Sue
There are estimated to be 2.5 million people worldwide with MS and the incidence is increasing. There seems to be a genetic predisposition to MS and environmental factors like diet, vitamin d, stress (lifestyle factors) precipitate it.
Please read these pages for an analysis of the possible causes and that the risks are higher if a family member already has MS.
http://www.overcomingmultiplesclerosis. ... ses-of-MS/
http://www.overcomingmultiplesclerosis. ... y-Members/
Yes Wendy, but there are 100,000 people in the UK with it, out of 60 million people all eating a rubbish diet, same lifestyle factors and genes.
7 billion people in the world and a paltry 2.5 million with ms. Why?

I appreciate your response but it adds to my question - doesn't answer it. Maybe no-one really knows???
Because ultimately it's a rare genetic disease? It is triggered by something and then lifestyle factors will influence the course.
And if they don't have the predisposition for MS then they have diabetes, heart disease, cancer or some other autoimmune disease!


suew wrote: Hi, apparently I have PPMS. Just found out age 51 and 3/4.

Have been researching what causes MS.
But if any of the reasons given are true (diet/vit D deficiency/bacteria/auto-immune disorder) then why are there not millions of fat, pale, unhealthy people in the western world with MS?
If you get my point? Why only in the thousands???

Sue
Dx 1992 OMS 25-2-09
Yes - please be careful. I was neither fat, pale nor unhealthy when I was diagnosed with MS. I was going to the gym 4 times a week and had been doing so for two years. I was watching my weight and have always been pretty fussy about what kind of food I eat and I live in Western Australia, which is a sunny place.I seem to recall from George's book that he was a regular runner, also ived in WA, and I would take a punt on him not being a terribly unhealthy eater pre his MS diagnosis. I feel the need to point out that your question could be considered a little offensive on an MS webiste. It is not our fault that we have MS.

My brother, my grandfather and his brother all have/had MS.
I think there is a predisposition. I once had a very complicated blood analysis and the doctor told me afterwards it showed that the weak point in my body was my nervous system ie. concurred with my diagnosis. He said on the other hand that it was unlikely I would develop cancer!
But as the others have said, I think it needs other factors to trigger it. There's a little book called "Demystifying multiple scleroris" (from Amazon) where the doctor who wrote it believes that stress is a very important factor - and this can take many different forms, both physical and emotional. I certainly know a number of PWMS who went through something very stressful shortly before the outbreakof the disease - and in my case it was definitely so. So in addition to OMS, which I adhere to pretty strictly, I'm also learning to react differently to certain situations :D
Globally about 73% of the population eat whole food plant centred diets none processed starch diets.
We over egg our perception of the developed world's population.
So we are looking at a minority population that gets western diseases sick.
I think the human body is amazing resistant to very high levels of abuse before it fails. We have obesity where an individual can weigh half a ton and still be alive. Clogging the arteries is a big killer.
Western diseases, if we take the what is it 7 main ones I suspect a great % of the developed world's population will have at least 3 of those in a life time.
I am so glad to have changed my eating habits.
I think I recall george saying that less than 1% of people have a genetic susceptibility to MS - and that someone with this susceptibility then needs multiple triggers (I think 3?) in order for the disease to develop. These triggers aren't necessarily diet etc - it could be e.g. glandular fever, stress and a head injury.
13 posts Page 1 of 2

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests