29 posts Page 1 of 3
I find that pilates and swimming are very good forms of exercise for people with MS. I noticed that with George J's diet, my balance improved considerably, making pilates easier! Do you ever read the messages on the discussion board, George? If so, please can you email me - I would love to tell you my experience of your wonderful diet!
Hi Julie I have been doing Pilates for nearly two years and I find it very beneficial to my balance and stability. I hope George "reads our messages" faye (sydney)
Excuse my ignorance but what is "Pilates" pls?
Pilates is a bit like yoga but a little bit more active - you don't get a meditation session/sleep in the middle! It basically involves gentle stretching exercises (mostly on the floor, but some standing, or holding onto a 'barre'). It concentrates on improving your 'core stability' and therefore helps with controlling your balance.
Hi after reading George's new book I felt I really needed to re-address the exercise aspect of the program. My legs tend to stop working after not a lot of walking and if there is an uneven or slight gradient either up or down it becomes a mission.
So the exercise aspect is dificult but more difficult mentally because I have felt in the past that the pathetic amount I could do is not going to be much use.

However once I got my head in the right place I decided to do whatever I could just to keep things moving. I started with barely 5 mins on the treadmill most days (hardly worth putting my sports shoes on). Today about 2 months later I was able to do 17mins. I have also been able to vary it and add a bit of hill work over the last couple of weeks. The speed setting never goes above 3.5 and I always need to hold on for my safety.

I have added a small amount of free hand weights, again pathetic from most people's standards.

I am fortunate that I work as a receptionist in an excellent Physio clinic; recently after returning from a Pilates seminar in Aussie which in part covered Pilates for those with neurological issues, specifically Parkinsons and MS, my boss decided to gift me an hour a week 1 on 1 Pilates session with her. This has helped me immensly and keeps me focused on doing my part at home because of the fact she is giving her time free.

I know for many, things like Pilates might be hard to add to the budget but if you can even do 1-2 sessions a month it is well worth it. You can then do the rest at home. It is just as effective for men as well as the ladies. I have seen many a builder-bloke who has had lower back issues get huge benefits - much to their amazement!

I have made very good gains (which has surprised everyone). They are very measurable and motivating; you find very quickly the areas which are weak and your strengths as well. You can even do a lot of it lying down if you need to.

What is really important though is you find someone who does Clinically driven Pilates, perhaps a Physio/Pilates combination rather than classes because a class situation can't really address your specific needs. For example I have to have theraband tied around my knees to do some of the moves properly :-). Likewise the Pilates DVD option might seem more cost effective but they are only really useful if you get the technique right and only a Pilates instructor can make sure of this. The DVD is not able to help your specific needs either.

Pilates is all about getting the muscles working properly (balanced) and developing core strength which will help to stabilize your movement.
For example most think you have to turn on your abdominal muscle groups 110% to get benefit in exercise but in effect this has a destablilzing effect. You only need a 30% activation and it is only the deep abdominals that need the attention so it is very gentle.

So if you can give Pilates a try.
Dx 1992 OMS 25-2-09
This topic is really encouraging so I am going to my first Pilates class tomorrow, my physio runs them and has been recommending I try them. I am now ready to try something different having been on the diet for 4 months now and seeing my balance and my walking slowly improve.

I will report back!

Wendy
Wendy

Diagnosis Dec 1998 OMS Feb 2010 Retreat Feb 2012
Yes, I do read all your messages. It is heartening to see so many of you heading in the right direction, and gradually stabilising and improving. That's what the website is about after all.

Wishing you all good health

George
Yay! Wendy let us know how you go.
Angela
Dx 1992 OMS 25-2-09
So far so good - I enjoyed my first session last night even though I took it easy most of the time. I was pleasantly surprised that I was still pretty flexible, and it didn't matter that my balance is not great as most of the class was lying down, so I didn't stand out as being different. I didn't feel too tired either so will work a little bit harder next time.

I will be back next week!

Wendy
Wendy

Diagnosis Dec 1998 OMS Feb 2010 Retreat Feb 2012
That's great Wendy it will be interesting to see our progress say 3 months down the track and be an encouragement to others to give it a go.
We have a real-time utrasound machine at the clinic which is used as a teaching tool to help people see the abdominal muscles working, get the right muscles activated and at the correct level so as to get the most benefit.
My session was very encouraging; I am the 'most padded' :-), and the least active because of MS limitations amongst the staff which includes the Physios and guess who had the best activation? Me!
So if I can do it anyone can.....
Angela
Dx 1992 OMS 25-2-09
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