NEU Research

Professor George Jelinek is Head of the Neuroepidemiology Unit (NEU) within the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne.

The NEU’s charter is to investigate the modifiable lifestyle risk factors that predict the progression of MS with a view to refining a preventive medicine approach to management of the disease.

The view from OMS: three-year STOP-MS study results

By OMSWebEditor on June 7, 2018

Dr Jonathan White gives his view on the three-year follow up results of the STOP-MS study which aims to investigate whether people with MS who attend lifestyle retreats, show improvement in symptoms after adapting their lifestyles.

The lead researcher’s view: Are people living healthier three years after an OMS retreat?

By OMSWebEditor on June 7, 2018

A new research paper from the Neuroepidemiology Unit (NEU) at the University of Melbourne aimed to investigate whether people with MS who have attended a lifestyle retreat are leading healthier lives three years later.

Vote For George Jelinek & NEU Team In Battle Of The Labs!

By Admin on May 2, 2018

Professor George Jelinek and the team at the NEU are competing in this year’s ‘Battle of the Labs’, and they need your vote!

“Genuine Hope” – Experiences of partners of people with MS

By Admin on January 31, 2018

A new NEU research paper examines the role and experience of partners of people with MS.

From the Professor’s Desk: gaining power over pain

By Associate Professor Tracey Weiland on September 19, 2017

Substantial pain is a major problem for many with MS. Affecting between 30-85% of people with MS, it can be headache, back or musculoskeletal pain, neuropathic pain, or may accompany spasms or spasticity.

From the Professor’s Desk: Australasians in the HOLISM study healthier than those in North America or Europe

By Web Editor on July 3, 2017

Ever wondered if there are differences between countries in how people with MS fare? At the Neuroepidemiology Unit (NEU) in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne, we were pondering this question.